Tag Archives: deep character

Questions 330: Writing Depressed Characters

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Scott asks: How do you write characters who *really* don’t want to leave the house?

Resources Mentioned:
Chronicles of Thomas Covenant The Unbeliever
The Hobbit
Captain’s Holiday

Questions 298: Emotions in Fiction

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Nicole asks:
“How do you write emotions  in your fiction that are different from what you experience?”

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Resources Mentioned:
Sherlock Holmes, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Article: “Empathy Depends on a Cool Head As Much As A Warm Heart”
Dick Tracy, the 1990 film
I Hate You, Don’t Leave Me by Jerold J. Kreisman

Questions 293: Mental Health in Fiction

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Nicole asks:
“Does accurate portrayal of mental illness makes an interesting story?”

Resources:
The Life of David Gale
House, MD
Sherlock 

Stephen King’s Misery (the film)
Misery by Stephen King

Deep Characterization 4: Authority Styles

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Today, I continue our series on deep characterization by exploring how a character’s relationship to hierarchy effects the way that character expresses, develops, and interacts with characters with other orientations.

Questions 270: Getting Characters to Speak to You

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Dan Dan the Art Man asks:
“How can you create characters that feel so real to you that your characters tell you where the story should go?”

Resources mentioned:
Writing the Blockbuster Novel by Albert Zuckerman
Writing to Sell by Scott Merideth

Deep Characterization 3: Relational Style

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In the third episode in our miniseries about how to think about character and characterization, we discuss the ways that a character’s relational style impacts the structure of their lives and is shown in how they respond to the world around them.

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Deep Characterization 2: The Social Drives

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In the second episode in our miniseries about how to think about character and characterization, we discuss the four basic social drives that are common to all humans, their roots, and how they can affect the flavor and makeup of a character.

This episode sponsored by BundleRabbit

Questions 233: Unreliable Narrators

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Vega asks:
“What kinds of unreliable narrators are there?”

Resources mentioned:
The Usual Suspects

How to Cheat at Everything by Simon Lovell

Social Engineering: The Art of Human Hacking by Christopher Hadnagy and Paul Wilson

Psychological Subtleties, vol 1 by Banachek

Lolita by Vladimir Nabakov